Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

3D max, Cinema 4D, Blender or your favorite 3D app

Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby KebleTar on 08/12/2010, 11:32 am

I don't see what this can be used for? The information about the products you mention is very limited and it only takes a few google searched to find the various products. I also find the "cons and pros" section very bad. Maya and 3ds Max don't have a steep learning curve at all. There is great support on the internet and they're easy to learn. Because they are so huge it is indeed hard to get into every tool but that's not necessary at all.
Same goes for Zbrush. I remember using borrowing a friends licence and I was able to sculpt models in a few hours. Then after another few hours and some internet research (mainly on pixologic's page) I was able to integrate my models seamlessly into a standard 3d-animation workflow using Zbrush's topology tools, map-creation, uv-layout etc. Never ever heard about Zbrush being hard to learn.

Oh and you need to add some important simulation-tools like FumeFX and Glu3d.
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby ShawnMi on 11/17/2010, 6:32 pm

I've been watching this thread with some interest and I think there are some misconceptions about why big studios are using Maya and/or 3DSMax over Cinema 4D. Cinema 4D is quite powerful and I think it's very difficult for the average user to find it's limits and (as other suggest) need to upgrade to a more "powerful" package.

The reason Maya is so popular is because the (modeling) tools are good, but more importantly because it's a GREAT application for workrgoup environments. All the "power" that you hear folks talking about is really in the MEL scripting language. With MEL, developers can write scripts that enable Maya to do most anything. C4D on ther other hand, is made for smaller studios and single users fulfilling multiple roles. Animation studios have the luxury of employing seperate TEAMS of animators, riggers, lighting engineers, texture artists, ect. Smaller studios don't. In fact, Lightwave is popular in braodcast and television for the same reason that Cinema 4D is... you don't need a team of specialists to get work done quickly. I also think this thread misses the fact that BodyPaint (which ships with all versions of C4D) is HEAVILY used in big studios for texturing, camera mapping (Projection Man) and matte painting. Anyway, that my contribution to this super long thread. :D

Oh yeah, I meant to add that this thread overlooked a VERY good NURBS modeling package... MoI 3D. It's inexpensive, stable, easy to use, powerful and outputs REALLY GOOD and clean .lwo and .obj files. For modeling mechanical objects (robots, machines, vehicles, etc), NOTHING beats MoI. :-)

http://www.moi3d.com

Thanks,

Shawn
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby Hamon on 11/20/2010, 5:50 am

ShawnMi wrote:I've been watching this thread with some interest and I think there are some misconceptions about why big studios are using Maya and/or 3DSMax over Cinema 4D. Cinema 4D is quite powerful and I think it's very difficult for the average user to find it's limits and (as other suggest) need to upgrade to a more "powerful" package.

The reason Maya is so popular is because the (modeling) tools are good, but more importantly because it's a GREAT application for workrgoup environments. All the "power" that you hear folks talking about is really in the MEL scripting language. With MEL, developers can write scripts that enable Maya to do most anything. C4D on ther other hand, is made for smaller studios and single users fulfilling multiple roles. Animation studios have the luxury of employing seperate TEAMS of animators, riggers, lighting engineers, texture artists, ect. Smaller studios don't. In fact, Lightwave is popular in braodcast and television for the same reason that Cinema 4D is... you don't need a team of specialists to get work done quickly. I also think this thread misses the fact that BodyPaint (which ships with all versions of C4D) is HEAVILY used in big studios for texturing, camera mapping (Projection Man) and matte painting. Anyway, that my contribution to this super long thread. :D

Oh yeah, I meant to add that this thread overlooked a VERY good NURBS modeling package... MoI 3D. It's inexpensive, stable, easy to use, powerful and outputs REALLY GOOD and clean .lwo and .obj files. For modeling mechanical objects (robots, machines, vehicles, etc), NOTHING beats MoI. :-)

Thanks,

Shawn


I agree with you!!!
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby AEUnleashed on 03/31/2011, 5:36 pm

I noticed you didnt include apple motion in the compositing section. I use After effects and will never change, but is motion any good.
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby wadeboggs on 05/29/2011, 6:29 pm

AEUnleashed wrote:I noticed you didnt include apple motion in the compositing section. I use After effects and will never change, but is motion any good.


I also noticed the omission of Apple Motion. I prefer After Effect as well. I guess there was no follow up to your question.

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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby AlekB on 06/21/2011, 2:03 pm

BIG NEWS! Pretty much all the power in these programs mentioned above is about to be unleashed on the world for free! Blender 2.6 is shaping up to be possibly the fastest vfx pipeline ever. 3d camera tracking will be integrated straight into blender. Layer based as well as Nuke like node based compositing will be in it. And the render engine is being updated and improved dramatically! This version will come out sometime on the next year or so. So if that is not a reason to wait before buying and expensive 3d or compositing program I don't know what is. And currently, Blender 2.58 is not a shabby 3d program with a much improved interface and renderer over 2.4x versions.
My Blender blog (with tutorials)
http://blenderforhumans.org
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby RaAci1232 on 06/30/2011, 11:05 am

AlekB wrote:BIG NEWS! Pretty much all the power in these programs mentioned above is about to be unleashed on the world for free! Blender 2.6 is shaping up to be possibly the fastest vfx pipeline ever. 3d camera tracking will be integrated straight into blender. Layer based as well as Nuke like node based compositing will be in it. And the render engine is being updated and improved dramatically! This version will come out sometime on the next year or so. So if that is not a reason to wait before buying and expensive 3d or compositing program I don't know what is. And currently, Blender 2.58 is not a shabby 3d program with a much improved interface and renderer over 2.4x versions.


do you have a link to where you read that?? cuz that is amazing news if its true. ive been using blender for a while and ive always been considering upgrading because of the renderer.
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby AlekB on 07/16/2011, 1:25 pm

Here is a link to GSoC info. This is where the Camera tracker comes from.
http://wiki.blender.org/index.php/Dev:R ... fCode/2011
Here is the link to the Render Engine:
http://wiki.blender.org/index.php/Dev:2 ... der/Cycles
Nuke like node compositing is already there for the most part. Google the Mango Project to see more about blender being developed for vfx.
My Blender blog (with tutorials)
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby sushilrai on 09/15/2011, 12:41 am

Have you started learning any of the 3d apps yet? I suggest you spend some time learning each one. If you have never done anything 3d before, then start out with an easy app like Blender or lightwave. Possibly try 3ds Max if your up for it. I wouldn't suggest Maya straight off the bat since its has a pretty steep learning curve. Unless you know what your doing, it will be a good few months before you get anything close to a full animated human.
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby AlekB on 09/15/2011, 6:54 am

Blender is not just some simple 3d app. It is very powerful just like 3ds Max
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby Bolg3r on 09/21/2011, 11:52 am

For rendering what is best? i got 3d max 2012 ( pretty new with it) and i want to make models and then place them on a real footage so it will be only some objects ( not a world of 3d) what renderer is good?

i saw that almost everybody uses V ray or Mental Ray... but i dont know the difference.. i dont want to make much architecture only a building or something like that

Thanx for the guide it is really good!!!
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby AlekB on 11/8/2011, 9:30 am

Blenders Cycles render engine is looking really good. Real time renders in the 3d viewport and other fun features. Also being free is a plus.
My Blender blog (with tutorials)
http://blenderforhumans.org
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby Sebastian556911 on 06/3/2012, 9:19 pm

why do you call blender mediocre its actually incredible
i my self have 3ds max 2012 and still prefer to use blender have you even used it
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby janiali on 07/12/2012, 5:06 am

it was great to know , thanks for great information it help in real
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby Warren on 12/15/2012, 9:15 am

wow, thanks for that information! The terragen is nice to learn about, downloading the free version now.
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby narenn on 12/31/2012, 8:12 am

Ok cleaned things up a bit. Removed about information and pricing, since they tend to fluctuate constantly.
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby IggyVanZen on 01/20/2013, 5:07 pm

where did all the descriptions go?
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby varxtis on 02/26/2013, 12:29 pm

Im trying to become more familiar with different programs, what they do, or what program is best to acheive certain effects. Ive done a lot of "for my eyes only" hobby videos, but I need to start becoming more serious about my learning and better figure out what direction I want to go. This obviously isnt going to happen over night, over a week, and probably not even over a few months... but Im just gonna move forward and ask questions, and fine tune my path. As I go, I see a lot of videos and vfx where I can say "oh ya, that was don't with this program" or "that program"... but there are some where I could see the vfx acheived in any number of programs. My question for the moment... Ive seen a lot of videos converted to vector style in pharmecutical commercials and general advertising and I want to know what program best acheves this effect. A prime example is shown in the Ident shorts that Prologue Films did for Paramount Channel. The way the website is set up the clips only came up for me when I right-clicked and opened in new tab. But anway, check out the Ident clips for their "action", "romance", "Academy", "Family", and "Drama" Catagories and pretty much the entire shorts are done in the style Im asking about.
What is the style called?
And what program actually does that type of animation? Im guessing a mix of 3DS Max and Adobe AE... but I have no clue how much is actually live action, and how much is CG from scratch.
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby rockguitarlp on 09/23/2014, 10:48 am

You forgot FumFx, AfterBurn, RayFire & Thinking Particles for simulation! :shock:
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Re: Industry Applications: A (Semi)-Complete Guide

Postby RyanJForth on 08/4/2015, 12:04 pm

Hey all... great list but no mention of Octane Render? It's a powerful render engine from otoy that is sold separately for several 3d applications. I was watching a NAB 2015 video where a VFX Art Director was showing off his workflow using Cinema 4D and Octane Render to produce shots for films like Avatar, Prometheus, Star Trek, Alice in Wonderland and Boardwalk Empire (TV). I think it's worth a mention!** (See link at bottom)

I could really use some help from someone who has experience with a lot of this software. I've been learning VFX for a while. I started with After Effects and learned it in and out including most plugins from VCP, Red Giant, and a few others. For the past few months I've been adding 3D into my workflow. I'm currently knowledgeable in the following software:

Premiere, Final Cut Pro, AE, Photoshop, Cinema 4D, Maya (very very basics... as much as is taught in the Gnomon Workshop "Intro to Maya" DVD), DaVinci. A few others but that's the main stuff.

The problem I've been having when I look for work is every compositing job seems to want Nuke, not AE. Every 3D job seems to want usually Maya, ZBrush for sculpting, and sometimes 3DS Max (Blizzard Entertainment uses this one, is it better for games?). Motion Graphics jobs typically use Cinema 4D which is why I learned it because every job I was reading wanted Cinema 4D. I would really prefer to be more into some form of 3D Animation - I enjoy too many areas so it's hard to pick a focus. I have a background in film and would really really like to be producing VFX and 3D assets for Film, TV, and Video Games. For my own personal interests and projects I would like to produce... I realistically need to learn at least one program in every category... Right now my "to learn" list consists of Maya (more in-depth), 3DS Max, ZBrush, Boujou, RealFlow, Nuke, Illustrator... probably more that I'm forgetting.

I'm looking to learn the software that will make me most desirable to employers in Film, TV, Animation, and Video Games. Obviously this is a huge list and some companies have their own proprietary software. Based on your experiences what software would you recommend? Is there a reason to learn multiple specialty programs like ZBrush AND Mudbox? For General 3D I think it's useful to know C4D, Maya and Max but I'd really like to learn software that will be useful in my own workflow as well as what will be highly desirable when looking for work. Any advice would be appreciated and I'm sure some others would benefit from it too!

Here's a link to the video I saw on C4D + Octane. This is what I'm leaning towards right now as well as ZBrush as I really like what this guy does. I can't find a direct link I think it's private on Vimeo but it's the second video on this page - Steve Messing: Hollywood Filmic Design Techniques...
http://greyscalegorilla.com/blog/tutori ... s-batch-1/
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